ATMS 411 Atmospheric Physics [main page] [homework] [2015 notes][2010 notes].

 


Week 8: 16 October

Homework 3 presentations begin on Monday.

Presentation for chapter 3.

Related Information

Discussion of atmospheric stability in general, to supplement the textbook discussion.

Another discussion of stability, and another.

The midterm exam is coming up. Here are two previous exams to use for study. Exam 1. Exam 2.

Here is the example sounding Excel spreadsheet we've been working on.
Here are calculations of the lapse rate, and graph of the potential and equivalent potential temperature for comparison. Click images for larger versions.
You have to do the graph on the right for your presentation, but not the one on the left.

 







Week 7: 9 October

Here is the spreadsheet we worked on during Monday's class.

Continue with Chapter 3, working with homework 3.
We will continue working with the this example spread sheet for calculating CAPE and precipitable water for your sounding.
Work very hard with your group to get this assignment done this week.
Presentations on this assignment start on Monday the 16th of October.
Reports are due after the presentations.

Presentation for chapter 3.

Related Information

Potential temperature and equivalent potential temperature for summer in Barrow and Rochambeau.

The midterm exam is coming up. Here are two previous exams to use for study. Exam 1. Exam 2.

 

 

 

 

Week 6: 2 October

Continue with Chapter 3, especially skewT logP diagrams, water vapor, and begin homework assignment 3.
Be sure to come to class. Use of the skewT diagrams for the atmosphere is much easier to understand that way.
Example: Measure the temperature and wet bulb temperature in the classroom. Then obtain the following:
1. Lifting condensation level.
2. Dew point temperature.
3. Relative humidity.
4. Potential temperature θ.
5. Wet bulb potential temperature θw.
6. Equivalent potential temperature θE.

Presentation for chapter 3.

Related Information

Skew T log P diagram as a gif file. Right click on the image and copy it. Paste it into 'Paint' to work with it.
Skew T presentation for in class discussions

 

 

Week 5: 25 September

Continue with Chapter 3, especially skewT logP diagrams, water vapor, and begin homework assignment 3.
Homework presentations for the assignment 2 will finish on Monday.

Presentation for chapter 3.

Related Information

Temperature and pressure in Barrow and Rochambeau for winter and summer. Click image for larger version.

Potential temperature and equivalent potential temperature for summer in Barrow and Rochambeau.

Lenticular cloud and waves in clouds: applications of stability and atmospheric gravity waves. Click on image for larger version.

September 2017 temperature in Reno (from the NWS). Reno soundings for 2017.

 

 

 

Week 4: 18 September

Continue with Chapter 3. Homework presentations for the assignment 2 begin on Friday. Work with your group to prepare for this assignment.

Related Information

Potential temperature and equivalent potential temperature for summer in Barrow and Rochambeau.

Hurricane tracks and sea surface temperatures. Click for larger image.

Week 3: 11 September

Homework 1 due on Monday.
Online homework assignment 2 has been posted.

Where we are headed:
Read chapter 3, Atmospheric Thermodynamics. We will have several homework assignments from this especially important chapter.
Presentation for chapter 3.

The goals (learning and review objectives)

a. Ideal gas equation applied to dry and moist air.
b. Virtual temperature.
c. Potential temperature.
d. Hydrostatic equation.
e. Increasingly detailed description of the temperature and pressure distribution in the atmosphere.
f. SkewT logP diagrams.
f-g. Relative humidity, absolute humidity.
g. Dew point temperature.
h. Wet bulb temperature.
i. Equivalent potential temperature.
j. Latent heat release and absorption in condensation and evaporation of water.
k. Stability of air parcels.
l. Indices on soundings.

Related Information

Meteorological analysis.

Student Chapter Meteorological Society Meeting Wednesday, 13 September 2017, 5 pm, Leifson Physics Conference Room.

Dry line moisture boundary.

Geostrophic wind -- relation to constant pressure surfaces

Cumulative hurricane tracks from 1985-2005 from NASA.
Ocean surface temperature.

Week 2: 4 September

Additional office hours (RM 213 of Leifson Physics) are available from 1 pm to 3 pm Tuesday September 5th.

You are encouraged to work with others on the homework, reach out to fellow students if you are interested in doing so.

Homework 1 (meteorology case study) is due 11 Sept 2017. See http://www.patarnott.com/atms411/homework2017.htm.
Turn it in through web campus.

Here's our case study from week 1.

Meteorology of the world: Use Google Earth to view locations and clouds
Look at data for 12Z, 24 August 2017
Near equator: Rochambeau French Guiana (get sounding for SOCA from the Wyoming site, plot pressure vs height, calculate density and plot versus height)
Near north pole: Barrow Alaska (get sounding for PABR from the Wyoming site, plot pressure vs height, calculate density and plot versus height)
Then we will fit a trendline for ln(Pressure) vs height to obtain the scale height of the atmosphere at these two locations, considering data to a height of 10 km.
Then we will observe and discuss the lapse rate Γ=-dT/dz from the slope of the temperature versus height graph.

Related Information:

We are looking at two sites representative of Earth locations spanning the extremes from the equator to the poles.

Here's a look at the 500 nm height of the atmosphere for August 2017, slow animation, faster animation, to appreciate the dynamical nature of the atmosphere.
We will return to this topic in our study of chapter 3.

Hurricane scale.
Hurricane description part 1, part 2.
Tropical cyclone structure.

 

Week 1: 28 August

Online Homework 1 is due 3 Sept 2017. See webcampus.
Homework 1 (meteorology case study) is due 11 Sept 2017. See http://www.patarnott.com/atms411/homework2017.htm.
Both will be turned in through web campus.

Homework for Monday and Tuesday: Read chapter 1.
This class will be one part lecture;
one part active class participation/activity involving atmospheric data from around the world;
and one part study using online modules for atmospheric science education.

Introductions -- each student introduce themselves and give their major.
Syllabus.
Homework. Homework style guide.
Webcampus for online homework assignments/reading.
Weather and geophysical data and models.

Free online Introductory Textbook for Atmospheric Science and local backup.

Overview Presentation: Atmospheric Science relies heavily on measurements and models!
Origin of Atmosphere and Composition presentation chapter 2.
Vertical structure of the atmosphere.

Meteorology of the world: Use Google Earth to view locations and clouds
Look at data for 12Z, 24 August 2017
Near equator: Rochambeau French Guiana (get sounding for SOCA from the Wyoming site, plot pressure vs height, calculate density and plot versus height)
Near north pole: Barrow Alaska (get sounding for PABR from the Wyoming site, plot pressure vs height, calculate density and plot versus height)
Then we will fit a trendline for ln(Pressure) vs height to obtain the scale height of the atmosphere at these two locations, considering data to a height of 10 km.
Then we will observe and discuss the lapse rate Γ=-dT/dz from the slope of the temperature versus height graph.

Notes from class on Wednesday. Click on images for larger version.




Related Information:

Weather

World record hail stone in Vivian South Dakota. See more on hail.

The Earth's atmosphere is very dynamic (movie 5 fps).

Discussion of baroclinic and barotropic conditions in the atmosphere.

 

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