ATMS 411 Atmospheric Physics [main page] [homework] [2017 notes] [2015 notes][2010 notes].

 


Week 5: 24 September

Monday, students present homework problems.

Read chapter 3, Atmospheric Thermodynamics.
We will have several homework assignments from this especially important chapter.
Presentation for chapter 3.
The goals (learning and review objectives)

a. Ideal gas equation applied to dry and moist air.
b. Virtual temperature.
c. Potential temperature.
d. Hydrostatic equation.
e. Increasingly detailed description of the temperature and pressure distribution in the atmosphere.
f. SkewT logP diagrams.
f-g. Relative humidity, absolute humidity.
g. Dew point temperature.
h. Wet bulb temperature.
i. Equivalent potential temperature.
j. Latent heat release and absorption in condensation and evaporation of water.
k. Stability of air parcels.
l. Indices on soundings.
m. Brunt–Väisälä frequency and gravity waves.

Related Information:

Skew T lnP graph showing dry adiabats.

Useful weather maps, including ThetaE.

Forecast weather maps for various pressure levels. And for Northern hemisphere.

Useful constants and facts.

The final project has been posted! Take a look and get started today.

Latent heat dependence on temperature, from here.

Potential temperature and equivalent potential temperature for summer in Barrow and Rochambeau.

 

 

 

Week 4: 17 September

Class Thursday.

Class Wednesday.

Class Tuesday.

Class Monday. Click for larger version.

Read chapter 3, Atmospheric Thermodynamics.
We will have several homework assignments from this especially important chapter.
Presentation for chapter 3.
The goals (learning and review objectives)

a. Ideal gas equation applied to dry and moist air.
b. Virtual temperature.
c. Potential temperature.
d. Hydrostatic equation.
e. Increasingly detailed description of the temperature and pressure distribution in the atmosphere.
f. SkewT logP diagrams.
f-g. Relative humidity, absolute humidity.
g. Dew point temperature.
h. Wet bulb temperature.
i. Equivalent potential temperature.
j. Latent heat release and absorption in condensation and evaporation of water.
k. Stability of air parcels.
l. Indices on soundings.
m. Brunt–Väisälä frequency and gravity waves.

Related Information:

Skew T lnP graph showing dry adiabats.

Useful weather maps, including ThetaE.

Forecast weather maps for various pressure levels. And for Northern hemisphere.

Hurricane eyewall and air motions.

Useful constants and facts.

The final project has been posted! Take a look and get started today.

El Niño forecast, tropical meteorology.

We celebrate the equinox this week.

NASA worldview look at satellite imagery from the MODIS sensor.

Halo caused by interaction of sunlight with ice crystals in cirrus could. Corona and cloud iridescence are also present. click for larger version.
From Carl Schmitt high in the Peruvian Andes, 2018.

 

 

 

Week 3: 10 September

Thursday class notes, click for larger version.

The final project has been posted! Take a look and get started today.

Wednesday class, we'll look at a presentation together and puzzle over the data set.

Monday and Tuesday class: Add the lapse rate calculation and discuss homework.
Be sure to work on the homework problem 3 between classes.

Notes from Monday, click for larger version.

Where we are headed:
Read chapter 3, Atmospheric Thermodynamics. We will have several homework assignments from this especially important chapter.
Presentation for chapter 3.
The goals (learning and review objectives)

a. Ideal gas equation applied to dry and moist air.
b. Virtual temperature.
c. Potential temperature.
d. Hydrostatic equation.
e. Increasingly detailed description of the temperature and pressure distribution in the atmosphere.
f. SkewT logP diagrams.
f-g. Relative humidity, absolute humidity.
g. Dew point temperature.
h. Wet bulb temperature.
i. Equivalent potential temperature.
j. Latent heat release and absorption in condensation and evaporation of water.
k. Stability of air parcels.
l. Indices on soundings.
m. Brunt–Väisälä frequency and gravity waves.

Related Information:

Atmospheric tides, paper, and website, and a second paper.

Cumulative hurricane tracks from 1985-2005 from NASA.
Ocean surface temperature.
Hurricane winds paper.
Hurricanes as heat engines, and associated article.
Discussion of hurricane intensification and climate.
Can we capture energy from a hurricane?

Sontag competition.

Clouds and Atmospheric Physics
(click images for larger version)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 2: 3 September

Tuesday notes. Click on images for larger version.
 

Thursday class: Arrive early if you can, and get started. We'll be working together on analysis for problem 3 of HW1.

Wednesday class: Start Excel and login to your account with your net ID.

Soundings from the equator in the warmest season, and from the north polar region in its coldest season, presentation. Compare and contrast. (Data from Rochambeau French Guiana and Barrow Alaska.)

Set up problem 3 from Homework 1, and work on it in class, total mass per unit area of the layers between UNR and DRI, and between DRI and Slide Mountain, as a time series.

Related Information:

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE TALK
Dr. Neil Larue, new Atmospheric Science professor at UNR will give a talk...
Friday, September 7th, from 4 – 4:30 pm "Wildfire Plume Dynamics"
Physics Conference Room, LP 200
All are invited


Data Lister Usage: Change those items listed in red boxes

 

Reno balloon races and sounding from Thursday's class. What recommendations would you give to the balloon pilots?
Click images for larger versions.

 

 

 

 

 

Week 1: 27 August

Thursday notes, sounding values from Antarctica and first model for the pressure variation with height. Click images for larger version

Quiz 1 was held Thursday in class.

 

Discussion on Wednesday, click image for larger version

 

Skew T presentation for in class discussions and as a gif file to be used with Paint.

Homework 1 is due 11 Sept 2018, to be turned in through web campus as well.

Online Homework 1 is due 2 Sept 2017. See webcampus. This is based on MetEd.

Homework for Monday and Tuesday: Read chapter 1.
This class will be one part lecture;
one part active class participation/activity involving atmospheric data from around the world;
and one part study using online modules for atmospheric science education.

Introductions -- each student introduce themselves and give their major.
Syllabus.
Homework. Homework style guide.
Webcampus for online homework assignments/reading.
Weather and geophysical data and models.

Free online Introductory Textbook for Atmospheric Science and local backup.

Overview Presentation: Atmospheric Science relies heavily on measurements and models!
Origin of Atmosphere and Composition presentation chapter 2.
Vertical structure of the atmosphere.

Related Information:

Weather

World record hail stone in Vivian South Dakota. See more on hail.

The Earth's atmosphere is very dynamic (movie 5 fps).

Discussion of baroclinic and barotropic conditions in the atmosphere.

Pittsburgh Spirit Fountain Cloud Physics and coordinate system (click image for larger version.)